Calendar
17 Jun
Artists: Alex Andropoulos, Feiko Beckers, Johnny Theodorus Wiekhart, Lucassen and Robbin Heyker
Vignette: And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks

Group exhibition - Johnny Theodorus Wiekhart, Feiko Beckers, Alex Andropoulos, Robbin Heyker and Lucassen

16 Aug
Artist: Anton Heyboer
Anton Heyboer

Unfortunately, Anton Heyboer (1924-2005) is better known to the general public for his five wives than for his wide-ranging body of work. Few remember that his work was bought by MoMA in New York, shown at documenta in Kassel and showcased in major exhibitions at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag and the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. In 1975 the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) even presented him alongside David Hockney and Lucian Freud as one of the most important European painters of that time. Now, 40 years after his last major exhibition, it is time to shine the spotlight once more on the international quality of Heyboer’s work.

02 Sep
Artist: Maaike Schoorel
Maaike Schoorel

The work of Maaike Schoorel (b. 1973) challenges the viewer’s ability to interpret what they see. By looking carefully and spending time with her canvas’ the apparently monochrome surfaces reveal themselves to be being made up of layers of coloured paint that describes faint landscapes, figures and still lifes. This autumn GEM is showing key works from Schoorel’s career, made between 2004 and 2017 in metropolises including London, New York, Rome and Amsterdam. The exhibition will also include some new works created specially for this show.

03 Sep
Artists: Jeroen Doorenweerd, Kazuo Shiraga, Shozo Shimamoto and others
Don’t Worry, the Moon Won’t Fall Down – Jeroen Doorenweerd meets Gutai

Jeroen Doorenweerd Meets Gutai brings together two worlds: those of the Japanese avant-garde group Gutai (1954–1972) and the Dutch artist Jeroen Doorenweerd (1962). Gutai’s performances, installations and exhibitions broke new ground. The artists became known for paintings of which action was an inextricable part: “painting action, not action painting”, they called it. Doorenweerd (b. 1962) feels a kinship with the Japanese group despite the decades and thousands of kilometres between them. Gutai’s mentality and energy mirror his own. For Doorenweerd, a painting is a document of place, time and energy: the result of a “painting action”, a gesture, a state of being that is deeply personal. Jeroen Doorenweerd Meets Gutai features video footage of performances by Gutai artists including Shozo Shimamoto, Kazuo Shiraga and Atsuko Tanaka alongside Doorenweerd’s latest series of paintings, Silverstudio and Pinkorange.

09 Sep
Artist: Céline Condorelli
Céline Condorelli: Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)

Céline Condorelli presents Stroom's exhibition space as a place for rehearsal and play. A series of carousels and spinning tops invites visitors to play and interact with them, while (historical) references of radical playground-designs show what play means for the city and for society.

The artworks of Condorelli often allow intimate contact usually excluded from cultural objects: her works can be used and touched. They have double or triple lives, make references to works by others, and fulfill different spatial functions, such as an entrance, a display-structure, background, seating, bookshelf or as a room-divider.

Both the carousels and the spinning tops are sculptural objects as well as play structures, whereby the tops also function as scale models of (existing and possible future) carousels. At the end of the exhibition, the carousels will be relocated to the schoolyards of two local schools in The Hague. The pupils of which have been actively involved as researchers in the development of this project. And 'Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)' is full of references: to Lina Bo Bardi, Palle Nielsen, Aldo van Eyck, Charles & Ray Eames and Constant to name a few. They are present in a series of new (wall) works developed by Condorelli with graphic designer James Langdon.

'Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)' is Condorelli's contribution to 'Attempts to Read the World (Differently)', a program in which Stroom together with various artists looks in a searching, intuitive way at our present world, the rapid developments therein and possible futures. And by doing so, imagines a possible new world.

'Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)' is made possible in part by the Mondriaan Fund, BankGiro Loterij Fonds and the City of The Hague.

09 Sep
Kim Boske

Kim Boske creates a new reality in her work, where she brings together multiple perspectives in one image. At first sight, her work looks like an impressionist landscape. The scenic and dreamy look of the work carries the viewer along to an almost fairy-tale world. Unique in her work is the apparent contradiction between the soft look of the image and the use of the photographic medium which is used to create razor-sharp images.

Kim composes her work by capturing different moments in time of the same image. In this way, time is not only an instrument to create the image, but also the subject of her research. The result of this process is a collection of images through time, which together form a new image. This constructed image could never exist but is made visible through layered fragments of time. During the exhibition, a special, limited edition print will be available.

Kim Boske (Hilversum, 1978) studied at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. Her work was shown at leading international museums, including the FOAM Photography Museum Amsterdam, MAM Moscow and the Dutch Photography Museum in Rotterdam.

09 Sep
Artists: Barbara Visser, Charl Landvreugd, Marga Weimans, Robert Glas, Yair Callender and others
On Speaking Terms

For the exhibition On Speaking Terms designers Lorien Beijaert and Arna Mačkić of Studio L A have created an experimental exhibition space. The various works of art will be displayed within the walls of Nest but in a new setting, to facilitate seeing things from new perspectives. On Speaking Terms shows art that questions we-them binaries and ‘me against them’ terms of thinking within our society. A temporary arena in the heart of Nest will invite you to form and exchange ideas on new views.

Initiated and designed by Studio L A.

09 Sep
Artists: Ann Demeulenmeester, Lee Bontecou, Peter Struycken, Wilhelm Sasnal, Yohji Yamamoto and others
Poetic Black

Black – the colour that Isaac Newton eliminated from the spectrum in the late 17th century – carries many meanings for artists and designers. This exhibition in the Vincent Award Room, entitled Poetic Black, brings the various aspects of black together in paintings, prints, fashion designs and poetry; the intriguing array of exhibits draws both on the Gemeentemuseum’s own holdings and on the contemporary art collection belonging to the Broere Charitable Foundation (Monique Zajfen Collection). The exhibition include works by Wilhelm Sasnal, Lee Bontecou, Yohji Yamamoto and Ann Demeulenmeester.

10 Sep
Curated by Jan Wattjes
Painting Now

Group show with paintings by young international artists, curated by gallery artist Jan Wattjes.

With works by Aaron van Erp (1978, Veghel) , Thijs Jansen (1986, Groningen), Ruri Matsumoto (1981, Tokyo, Japan), Ingrid Simons (1976, Eindhoven), Amir Tirandaz (1984, Shiraz, Iran) and Jan Wattjes (1981, Den Haag).

16 Sep
Dennis Tyfus – Enfant Terrine

In September 1646 opens the new season with an exhibition of the Antwerp based artist Dennis Tyfus. We have been intrigued by him and have been following his work and his label Ultra Eczema for about 10 years now.

Dennis Tyfus (Antwerp, 1979) is known for an oeuvre that is difficult to categorize. It grows out of the things he finds important and results in a practice that is unceasing. Ranging from drawings, paintings, collages, poems, installations, video’s to magazines and books (published & distributed under his own label Ultra Eczema) to music, vinyl record productions and radio shows on air at Radio Centraal.

Last year, during our visit to the former convent where Tyfus lives and works, he offered us some insight into his particularly versatile practice, which encompasses a great variety of materials and media, including the granite memorial stone stating ‘Here Lies Dennis Tyfus’, which was to be installed on the facade under Tyfus’ bedroom window on the day of our visit.
Tyfus is simultaneously an outcast and a unifying factor in the Antwerp art scene. He uses the record label Ultra Eczema as a vehicle for all sorts of collaborations with a range of artists and musicians, that causes uncertainty when it comes to position his work for both the art world professionals as for the wider audience. His work often hovers in the grey area between arts, city life and popular culture as the context for his work. Through these unexpected moves the works have an even stronger impact on us.
An example of this is the video piece ‘Gargles from Ipanema’, which he developed for the Mechelen-Nekkerpoel train station and featured an aged woman, dancing erotically on sultry muzak. The work lead to such controversy and complaints by commuters, that it was removed shortly after its installment.

We can’t wait to see what Tyfus has in store for 1646 and are eager to see how he will play with the unwritten rules of the space and its visitors.

16 Sep
Artists: Alex Burch, Debbie Young, Harriet Morley and Katarina Sidorova

‘I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness’, born as a dog I now am howling.

A howl echoes through the corridors perpetually. For every soul forgotten, for every brain in the back row, for every maker who relishes making, for every romantic, for every one who questioned life’s worth but chose to truly live.

For all of these I howl, for I’m a dog»

In this edition of Billytown Kitchen sessions, SID YOUNG has taken Allen Ginsberg famous poem 'Howl' as the starting point of inspiration, whilst continuing to question the human condition from the perspective of now. In the times of cynicism, overpowering irony and glorification of sarcasm, is there still space for an honest, loud, pure human emotion? The answers you may find in the works of Debbie Young, Katerina Sidorova, Harriet Morley and Alex Burch.

SID YOUNG - alumni from KABK, The Hague - have invited two Glasgow based artists Morley and Burch in order to continue their international platform to expose young artists. Several SY exhibitions have already taken place with many future plans under their belt which will continue to highlight The Hague as a breeding ground for artistic talent.

16 Sep
Artist: Bea McMahon

Solo project by Bea McMahon

16 Sep
Artist: Paul Beumer
The message of the flower is the flower

After various residencies in Xiamen, Beijing and Tokyo and an extended stay in Taipei, Paul Beumer returns to The Hague for his second solo exhibition at Dürst Britt & Mayhew. For this exhibition he will create several site-specific installations made out of pieces of fabric that have been treated with his own interpretations of ancient Asian techniques for painting and dying.

22 Sep
Curated by Baruch Gottlieb & Marie-José Sondeijker
Feedback #1, Marshall McLuhan and the Arts

Marshall McLuhan (CA), Wolfgang Spahn (AT), Darsha Hewitt (CA), Christof Migone (CA), Thomas Begin (CA), Haroun Farocki (DE), !Mediengruppe Bitnik (DE/CH), Mogens Jacobsen (DK), Reynold Reynolds (USA), Hito Steyerl (DE), Peter Blegvad (UK), Willy Lemaitre (CA) & Angela Washko (USA), Stephanie Syjuco (USA), MRZB (IT),

Recursive exhibition and symposium project. Celebrating the synthetic practices of the Toronto School, featuring the radical experimental publishing work of Marshall McLuhan as art. Feedback’ brings artists, designers, scholars and thinkers together to probe, encounter and contest the light-speed electronic information environments we inhabit today.

Exploding out of the wreckage of World War II the early cyberneticists Norbert Wiener and Claude Shannon, sketched out a future where even thinking could be automated. Marshall McLuhan saw in the electronic information of global instantaneous mass-communication of the satellite and tv age, the end of the rational tradition of enlightenment Humanism, and the emergence of a ‘Global Village’ and ‘Global Theater’ where people would be caught up in their interconnectivity and develop new social art forms.

The pace of technological transformation, automation and globalisation has resulted in massive human migration, precaritization, displacement and new transitional modes of existence. Publics are formed and dissolved algorithmically according to need, no longer on the level of opinion or knowledge, but according to advanced social cybernetics of the advertising economy. The medium is the message.

23 Sep
Uta Eisenreich – This, That and Other

In the exhibition This, That and Other Uta Eisenreich (b. 1971) flirts with Dada and De Stijl. Her scientific-looking still lifes are built on a sense of logic and universal order, and their structure is linear and precise. But we also discover in her work a tendency towards complete nonsense and absurd humour, as if Mondrian’s compositions had hooked up with Schwitters’ sound poem Ursonate. Inspired by Mondrian’s abandonment of the figurative, Eisenreich explores the space between abstract and concrete forms, experimenting like a child with the potential meanings of geometric shapes and lines and sounds. Is there a grey area between the world of the abstract and the world of concrete meaning? Optical illusions also play a major role in Eisenreich’s work, as she uses them to further disrupt our already precarious powers of perception.

23 Sep
Hans Eijkelboom. Identities 1970 – 2017

For more than 25 years Hans Eijkelboom (b., 1949) has been photographing the restless crowds that pass through city centres. With his camera at chest level, he goes looking for commonalities and resemblances in the appearance and behaviour of chance passers-by. In the resulting series of snapshots, you are first struck by the similarities: green parkas with blue jeans, short denim skirts with black leggings, Rolling Stones t-shirts, and sleeveless checked shirts. Only gradually do you notice how much effort everyone has put into finding a distinctive combination or some other way of adding their own twist to the current fashion. This body of work, which by now consists of almost 6,000 Photo Notes, shows how difficult it is to fulfil our desire for individuality within the framework of consumer society. In collaboration with the Photographischen Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur in Cologne, The Hague Museum of Photography is now holding a retrospective, ranging from Eijkelboom’s early career in the 1970s to his most recent street photography, including Photo Notes made in The Hague's city centre and new work created especially for documenta 14.

30 Sep
Artist: Gert Scheerlinck
Objects Of Disguise

We are pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of Gert Scheerlinck in the Netherlands. Through his sculptures, Scheerlinck is questioning the meaning of sculpture from the legitimacy that produces its placement in the art institution. We can read his sculptures as an invitation to think along with the artist, about the origins and the trajectory of these materials. By using everyday materials that surround us, he not only questions continuity and connectivity, but he also challenges us at different angles, starting with very important values: industrialization, awareness of ecological disasters on our planet, communication, …

Scheerlinck investigates the meaning of objects, he revaluates them by making new and unusual combinations and turns the objects into a sculpture, a sculpture that forces us to think. For example the piece ‘Camisole’, a very important work of art for the artist himself. Scheerlinck removed all fabric and kept the embellishment of the Camisole. He combined it with a bended rusted metal rod. This resulted in a typical fragile sculpture. A combination of soft and hard, warm and cold materials, that plays with our state of mind. Camisole shows us that everything can become everything else. Every object can get a different meaning and make new associations.

In his exhibition OBJECTS OF DISGUISE, Scheerlinck shows us sculptures as if it where reconstructed memories or events. The artist often creates this other place, that is neither commemorative nor apocalyptic, it is the small circle of common things. His work enters into that hybrid zone of the global and the local, where the artist opens a conversation between territorial and the universal. His work exists across a variety of mediums in a world that questions objects. Some sculptures even contain a performative character and encourage us to participate in what is happening. In the end the artworks are all about you and the possible story it can give us. It opens up memories, emotions and reflect on the possible story the sculptures tell us.

Gert Scheerlinck his work has been shown around the world in various institutions, festivals, and galleries. Selected exhibitions include: “We Others” at Biennale Non-Objective Art, France (2017), “More canvas please” at Sofie Van de Velde Gallery, Antwerpen (2016) “Atelier C” at Museum M, Leuven (2014) and “Off the Wall” Tarrace Gallery, London (2014)

02 Oct
Play your city

This autumn marks the fourth time in a row that Stroom organizes an exhibition in Atrium City Hall The Hague. The exhibition 'Play your city' (Speel je stad) zooms in on the importance of outdoor play, a physical interaction with the urban environment, a view of the city as a playground and what the contribution of art could be in this field. The exhibition features a.o. scale models of a selection of Art-at-school projects initiated by Stroom, and the video 'Voice of Children' by the British collective Assemble. In addition, the exhibition design actively invites visitors to come and play.

Play your city (Speel je stad) is generously supported by: the City of The Hague, Stichting Atrium City Hall, BankGiro Loterij Fonds and Bouwfonds Cultuurfonds.

Parallel to 'Play your city' (Speel je stad), but from an entirely different perspective, Stroom presents the exhibition 'Céline Condorelli: Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)', also focusing on what play means for the city and for the society we live in (9 September - 19 November 2017).

14 Oct
Marthe Wéry – Sopistication on paper

The subtle and sophisticated work of Marthe Wéry (1930-2005) owes its effectiveness to its very simplicity. It is all about the expressive power of lines, planes and colour in relation to space. This exhibition in the Berlage Room presents highlights of Wéry’s oeuvre from the 1970s and ’80s – a period when she was working on paper.

21 Oct
No Choice Tattoo on MuseumNight with Dennis Tyfus

A surprise party on your body!

In the context of his exhibition 'Enfant Terrine' artist Dennis Tyfus decided to offer an evening of No Choice Tattoos:
A permanent surprise!
No shadows, no colors, no stencils, NO CHOICE!
To get your tattoo, make a reservation by sending an email to: info@1646.nl
A small tattoo costs 80 euros. The only choice you have concerns the size and place or bodypart.
Dennis Tyfus (Antwerp, 1979) is not at all preoccupied with art and even less with the art world. He simply draws, paints, takes photographs, makes films, plays noise music, sings, parodies, produces gramophone records and CDs, creates books and magazines, has a programme on Radio Centraal, makes collages, and lodges his oeuvre under the Ultra Eczema label.

21 Oct
Bieke Depoorter – As it may be

Magnum photographer Bieke Depoorter has visited Egypt regularly since 2011. She first went there during the Arab Spring. Travelling through the country, Depoorter set out to explore the downside of the uprising. During this time of great uncertainty and mistrust, each day she would look for a new place to spend the night, preferably with a family in their home. Looking beyond the news and the politics, she searched for the intimate moments that often happen at home. As Bieke keeps trying to connect, she gradually becomes more aware of her status as an outsider, both culturally and as a photographer. In 2017 she decided to return to Egypt again. She engaged in a dialogue about the pictures and gave other people a voice in her work. From 21 October The Hague Museum of Photography will be showing an exhibition of the resulting work, for which Depoorter was awarded the prestigious Prix Levallois earlier this year.

21 Oct
Artists: Evelyn Hofer, Fons Brasser, Holger Niehaus, Wally Elenbaas and others
Photography and Form

Triangles, squares and circles – look around you and you see them everywhere. So it’s hardly surprising that geometrical forms occur constantly in our everyday image culture, especially in the field of photography. Frequently they are deliberately captured by the photographer; sometimes they are a happy accident. The Gemeentemuseum Den Haag possesses a large photographic collection, which the Hague Museum of Photography is keen to showcase. The multifaceted subject of ‘geometry’ is the starting point of this overview, which includes the most aesthetic and dramatic examples in the Gemeentemuseum’s collection.

26 Oct
Learning from… Aldo van Eyck

The architect Aldo van Eyck (1918-1999) designed more than 900 public playgrounds in post-war Amsterdam, commissioned by the Municipal Department of Public Works. According to Van Eyck "the unsuitability of the modern city for children calls into question its suitability for everyone." With these words in mind the architect Saša Radenovic looks at Sarajevo, the city he left in 1994. He wonders how he can use the Dutch know-how and the ideas of Van Eyck to inspire architects, urban planners and city administrators to create more space for playing children. Aldo van Eyck wrote about his ideas for the city in his text (and book) The Child, The City and the Artist (1962). Max Risselada, who was a professor at TU Delft for many years and who actually worked with Aldo van Eyck, will use this text and the work of Constant Nieuwenhuys to tell us more about the context in which the playgrounds were created. The two speakers will also engage in a discussion with the audience about why Van Eyck is still relevant today, both for the city in general and for The Hague in particular.

Part of program Stroom School: Céline Condorelli: Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)

02 Nov
Artist: Anna Fafaliou
The Things I Own Own Me

twelve twelve is honoured to present the first exhibition of Anna Fafaliou in the Netherlands. In her work the artist investigates the visual and physical ways of remembering and how memory shapes us. Working with performance as well as sculpture she focuses on how we perceive and handle an individual as well as a collective memory. Thereby always using white, Anna Fafaliou is interested in colour theory and especially the capabilities of colourlessness. The importance of the lack of colour in her work arouse from the idea that even a hint of tint triggers a certain memory. For her whiteness does not impose anything onto the senses but rather serves to facilitate the creativity of the mind. Or as Kandinsky said: “White resonates, like a silence that can suddenly be understood.”

For the artist our everyday belongings and notions are closely linked to our emotions and memories. She asked for example an audience to bring personal everyday objects to a performance. She painted them white and hangs them randomly on the walls in a small room filling it completely from bottom to top. All the sudden the importance of one specific object was gone. The memory behind them seamed deleted and a new story could be implemented. Fafaliou investigates the relationship between us and our belongings, arguing that in a consumer society, it seems that we justify ourselves through our belongings. We even associate our emotions and memories with materials and objects. By removing colour the identity and attachment one has to objects is put into question.

Anna Fafaliou points out that we are defined by our memory. At the same time we own objects to define our memory and to surround us with them. The show Things I Own Own Me deals with the idea to leave out this memory in order to show us the importance of imagination. It questions our possessions. It questions what belongs to us, and what do we want to own.

Anna Fafaliou (*1987) obtained a MA from the School of Fine Arts, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, she underwent an MA in Film and Visual Arts, University of London. Since then her work has been shown around the world in various institutions, festivals, galleries. Selected exhibitions include: “Sleep” at Bangkok Art & Culture Centre (2016), “Concrete Matters” group show at Whitechapel Gallery / Cass (2016), “Windows” at Art Miami (2016), “Maps” group show at Scene Art (2015).

02 Nov
Artist: Anna Fafaliou
The Things I Own Own Me

We are honoured to present the first exhibition of Anna Fafaliou in the Netherlands.
In her work the artist investigates the visual and physical ways of remembering and how memory shapes us. Working with performance as well as sculpture she focuses on how we perceive and handle an individual as well as a collective memory. Thereby always using white, Anna Fafaliou is interested in colour theory and especially the capabilities of colourlessness. The importance of the lack of colour in her work arouse from the idea that even a hint of tint triggers a certain memory. For her whiteness does not impose anything onto the senses but rather serves to facilitate the creativity of the mind. Or as Kandinsky said: “White resonates, like a silence that can suddenly be understood.”

For the artist our everyday belongings and notions are closely linked to our emotions and memories. She asked for example an audience to bring personal everyday objects to a performance. She painted them white and hangs them randomly on the walls in a small room filling it completely from bottom to top. All the sudden the importance of one specific object was gone. The memory behind them seamed deleted and a new story could be implemented. Fafaliou investigates the relationship between us and our belongings, arguing that in a consumer society, it seems that we justify ourselves through our belongings. We even associate our emotions and memories with materials and objects. By removing colour the identity and attachment one has to objects is put into question.

White does not only delete memory but opens up for a new possible content. Seeing for example a white picture the spectator’s imagination is encouraged to bring up an inner picture. Only the title could lead into a possible direction. The series windows plays with this idea. Wooden window frames are covered with canvas and on top layers of plaster are arranged. It seems like curtains, which cover a window, and behind the curtain the story takes place. Sometimes the “curtain” forms itself to wildly placed wrinkles sometimes it seems like multiple straight lanes from top to bottom. An abstract texture occurs. Both the lack of colour as well as the shape of the surface of each piece gives the opportunity to capture a picture out of ones imagination. Thereby the personal as well as a collective memory is addressed.

Anna Fafaliou points out that we are defined by our memory. At the same time we own objects to define our memory and to surround us with them. The show Things I Own Own Me deals with the idea to leave out this memory in order to show us the importance of imagination. It questions our possessions. It questions what belongs to us, and what do we want to own.

Anna Fafaliou (*1987) obtained a MA from the School of Fine Arts, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, she underwent an MA in Film and Visual Arts, University of London. Since then her work has been shown around the world in various institutions, festivals, galleries. Selected exhibitions include: “Sleep” at Bangkok Art & Culture Centre (2016), “Concrete Matters” group show at Whitechapel Gallery / Cass (2016), “Windows” at Art Miami (2016), “Maps” group show at Scene Art (2015).

04 Nov
Hans de Jong – Keramist

Humour and craftsmanship go hand in hand in the work of ceramic artist Hans de Jong (1932-2011). With no concern for the possible functions of his objects, he modelled clay into fantastical creatures and playful figures with names like Crybaby, Flyfrog, Flatlander and His Transparency. Both his figurative objects and his vessels offer, as he himself put it, ‘the luxury of absolute superfluity’. You can do almost nothing with them except look at them – but the complexity of the skin and graphic details provides plenty to see. This is the first exhibition since the artist’s death to survey his entire oeuvre.

04 Nov
Curated by Anne Geene
The Museum of the Plant

By looking at photography, you will discover interesting things about the world. That’s what Anne Geene does in her own way, both in her own work and in what she finds in photo archives. With great curiosity she explores plants and animals. In her exhibition The Museum of the Plant, Anne acts as a curator of nature and categorizes her high precision hair findings.

She studies and documents her material in search of patterns and phenomena, retrieves information and images from relevant literature. She makes her conclusions world-wide in photo works and in book form. What the camera has objectively registered is the basis of all her work. Her research is contingent on that of a scientific researcher. However, she is looking for visual similarities and patterns and bases her conclusions on underlying processes solely on this.

Anne Geene (Breda, 1983) studied Arts and Culture at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and photographed at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts KABK and captures hidden beauties of plants and animals as an artist.

04 Nov
Still Movements, Lorena van Bunningen

Lorena van Bunningen investigates in her work the rational versus the subconscious. She is looking for what her work is asking for. Something which does not arise from a thought but by a process.

In the exhibition Still Movements she captures the moment between the silence and the movement. Capturing this event of a small event, produces images in which time seems silent.

In daily life, we use numerous rituals that we are unaware of and hear many objects. These stupid moments are recorded by Lorena. She is looking for the moment when a known object loses its familiarity and functionality and becomes abstract. She looks at the daily environment, materials and dealing with the material world around us. She sees objects as traces, as evidence of our actions and of our existence.

Lorena van Bunningen (Quito 1990) studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in The Hague. In 2017 she was the favourite of the audience during Beelden in Leiden.

09 Nov
Learning from… Hannah Arendt

In her work and in this exhibition Céline Condorelli is inspired by the ideas and political philosophy of Hannah Arendt (1906-1975); and especially by Arendt's view of culture as "the company one chooses to keep, amongst people, amongst things, amongst thoughts, in the present as well as in the past". Therefore, we invited the philosopher Daan Roovers to tell us more about the ideas and theories of Hannah Arendt. Roovers recently wrote Mensen maken. Nieuw licht op opvoeden (Ambo/Anthos 2017), focusing, amongst others, on Arendt's interpretation of the concept of amor mundi - ‘love for the world'.
Part of program Stroom School: Céline Condorelli: Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)

12 Nov
Artist: Jürgen Brodwolf
Malerhimmel

Special selection of recent paintings, objects and works on paper by the famous Swiss artist Jürgen Brodwolf

12 Nov
Artist: Simon Schrikker
Dark mountains – Seeing things

New paintings, works on paper and video by Dutch artist Simon Schrikker

12 Nov
Artist: Simon Schrikker
Opening exhibition Simon Schrikker by Olphaert den Otter

Opening of our new solo exhibition of Simon Schrikker by Dutch artist Olphaert den Otter. Also opening: Malerhimmel, solo exhibition of Jürgen Brodwolf.

12 Nov
My Secret Garden

This solo exhibition is a beautiful combination of recent sculptures, drawings and paintings. The series of drawings on view, are made plein air next to the Sioule, a meandering river in the lush green landscape of the Auvergne. The paintings too have their roots abroad: Warffemius painted them after a visit to Hohhot in Inner Mongolia. Right next to the Wuta Si Temple, an age-old Buddhist monument in the city, an inhabitant cultivates calabashes, that grow downwards like a hanging garden. This image inspired Warffemius to paint a new series of paintings in which verticals are strongly present. Until recently, Warffemius focused on trees and their branches in his three dimensional work, and translated this into robust sculptures of steel and bronze. Now he looks at the roots of the trees, and takes his inspiration from mangroves with their roots that support the plant like a palisade. My Secret Garden brings the different media in which Warffemius works together, and gives a clear notion of his recent developments.

During PAN Amsterdam (19-26 November) the gallery is opened by appointment only.

15 Nov
Film program: Adventure Playgrounds

Esmé Valk presents her research into adventure playgrounds, illustrated by a series of unusual films. Adventure playgrounds are places where children can use all kinds of materials like planks, pallets, car tires, stones, pieces of plastic and other junk, to play with. They can play freely and unrestrictedly. They can do whatever they want. They can build something (or to tear it down). Adventure playgrounds were a reaction to the asphalt playgrounds with their rigid play-structures like slides, swings, seesaws and sandboxes.
Part of program Stroom School: Céline Condorelli: Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)

Followed by: 20.00 - 21.30 hrs
Lecture The Playground Project
by Gabriela Burkhalter

15 Nov
Lecture The Playground Project

Over the past few years various international museums organized exhibitions dedicated to the subject of play. One of them was The Playground Project in Kunsthalle Zürich (spring 2016), curated by the political scientist and urban planner Gabriela Burkhalter. In 2008 she started an ongoing research project and online archive on the history of playgrounds: www.architekturfuerkinder.ch. She made various exhibitions on the basis of this research and manages the archive of Group Ludic, whose Buiteltuinen (rough and tumble playgrounds) are the subject of a Stroom window display.
Part of program Stroom School: Céline Condorelli: Proposals for a Qualitative Society (Spinning)

18 Nov
Artist: Eric Giraudet de Boudemange
Apenkooi
19 Nov
Artists: Andreas Albrectsen, Ante Timmermans, Bas Princen, Ben Zegers, Daniel Poller, Gert Jan Kocken, Jonas Wijtenburg, Jop Vissers Vorstenbosch, Lucian Wester, Marco Maria Zanin, Matts Leiderstam, Ola Lanko, Peggy Buth, Rini Hurkmans, Sigmund de Jong, Stefan Burger, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Ties ten Bosch, Timm Rautert, Tony Scherman, Welmer Keesmaat and others
ART – HISTORY – COLLECTION a selection from the collection Reyn van der Lugt

Art – History – Collection showcases a selection of artworks from the collector and former museum director Reyn van der Lugt’s extensive trove of contemporary art. Specially for Parts Projects, he has made a selection of photographs, drawings, paintings and sculptures that refer to the rich world of art history, from the destruction of images to their reproduction, from the process of creating art to the exhibition of it. 
 
All his life, Van der Lugt has been interested in various aspects of art history, from the Greeks and Romans through the Renaissance and classicism to the present day. He says, “I find it fascinating when contemporary artists allow themselves to be influenced by the visual language of the past and take it as a point of departure for their own art, whether as inspiration or as the subject of commentary.” Art – History – Collection bears witness to this fascination, shared by the collector and the artists. 

19 Nov
Artists: Andreas Albrectsen, Ante Timmermans, Bas Princen, Ben Zegers, Daniel Poller, Gert Jan Kocken, Jonas Wijtenburg, Jop Vissers Vorstenbosch, Lucy Andrews, Marco Maria Zanin, Matts Leiderstam, Ola Lanko, Peggy Buth, Rini Hurkmans, Sigmund de Jong, Stefan Burger, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Ties ten Bosch, Timm Rautert, Tony Scherman, Welmer Keesmaat and others
ART – HISTORY – COLLECTION a selection from the collection Reyn van der Lugt

Art – History – Collection showcases a selection of artworks from the collector and former museum director Reyn van der Lugt’s extensive trove of contemporary art. Specially for Parts Projects, he has made a selection of photographs, drawings, paintings and sculptures that refer to the rich world of art history, from the destruction of images to their reproduction, from the process of creating art to the exhibition of it. 
 
All his life, Van der Lugt has been interested in various aspects of art history, from the Greeks and Romans through the Renaissance and classicism to the present day. He says, “I find it fascinating when contemporary artists allow themselves to be influenced by the visual language of the past and take it as a point of departure for their own art, whether as inspiration or as the subject of commentary.” Art – History – Collection bears witness to this fascination, shared by the collector and the artists. 

24 Nov
The Knight’s Move: Mireille Hildebrandt

Mireille Hildebrandt will explore digital space and the cityscape. Hildebrandt calls the fusion of online and offline worlds ‘the Onlife World'. She highlights the boundaries between on- and offline worlds to find out if they are becoming increasingly artificial: we have to make this distinction to retain some of our personal space. The question will be what kind of humans we may become when ‘living with algorithms' is the new normal. How can we learn to live in the Onlife World without being cynical about the upcoming smart cityscape?

The Knight's Move
The Knight's Move is a series of lectures by eminent international speakers who stand out by their unusual, enlightening and inspirational visions concerning the city, urbanity, the public domain, and community.

25 Nov
Artists: Julio González and Picasso
González, Picasso and Friends

Together with Constantin Brancusi and Pablo Picasso, the Spanish artist Julio González (1876 – 1942) is considered one of the most important sculptors of the 20th century. This retrospective of over 100 works, most of which are being exhibited in the Netherlands for the first time, sheds light on his personal development: from his days as a metal worker in his father’s workshop in Barcelona to his time as an avant-garde sculptor in Paris. It also addresses the unique collaboration and friendship between González and Picasso. For both artists, the collaboration provided a major push to further development. Thanks to González, Picasso discovered new modes of expression in sculpture and for González the collaboration was the final leg of his journey towards a distinctive artistic style. This exhibition at the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag focuses principally on González’s development. With no fewer than 20 works by Picasso, it is also a celebration of the friendship between the two men.

02 Dec
Artist: Jeroen Blok
IT’S NO USE GOING BACK TO TOMORROW

Jeroen Blok integrates found imagery directly into his works as collage pieces. Trough the combination of diverse images he transforms the known in order to create new worlds or events which doesn’t exist and never will. Consequently, the work reflects on an idea of an utopia sometimes represented by the captivating, wonderful imagery of far away holiday locations. Rather than magical his work tends to be realistic and attempts to break down the myth of an ideal world yet to visit.